CONFERENCE: Empires of Science in the Long Nineteenth Century

From UCSD Science Studies Program (blog):

Empires of Science in the Long Nineteenth Century
9-10 April @ Huntington Library
Register by 2 April 2010

Empires of Science in the Long Nineteenth Century

This international conference explores the relationship during the long nineteenth century between rapidly developing science and technology and the expansion of territorial empires, exploring issues such as: How was science actually practiced on national and imperial frontiers? What role did science and technology play in the development of political and intellectual empires? What influence did governments and scientific institutions have in creating, regulating, and disseminating scientific research and practice within empire?

Friday, April 9, 2010
8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:30 Welcome Robert C. Ritchie (The Huntington)
Remarks Nigel Rigby (National Maritime Museum)

Session 1 Networks of Empire
Moderator: Nigel Rigby

Crosbie Smith (University of Kent)
Energies of Empire: The Making of Long Distance Ocean Steamships in the
mid-Nineteenth Century

John McAleer (National Maritime Museum)
Stargazers at the Worlds End: Observatories, Telescopes, and Views of
Empire in the Nineteenth-Century British World

12:00 Lunch

1:00
Session 2 Mapping Space
Moderator: Kathryn Olesko (Georgetown University)

John Rennie Short (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
Cartographic Encounters on the Nineteenth-Century United States Western
Frontier

Michael Reidy (Montana State University)
From Oceans to Mountains: The Spatial Construction of Empire

Session 3 Natural History
Moderator: Robert C. Ritchie

Janet Browne (Harvard University)
Nature on Display: Collecting and Showing Natural History Specimens in the
Age of Empire

Daniel Headrick (Roosevelt University)
Botany in the Dutch and British Colonial Empires

Saturday, April 10, 2010
9:00 Registration & Coffee

9:30
Session 4 Imperial Spaces
Moderator: Adam R. Shapiro (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

Daniela Bleichmar (University of Southern California)
Rediscovering the New World: Spanish Imperial Science, ca. 1780-1810

Lewis Pyenson (Western Michigan University)
Two Incarnations of Athena: Scientists in the Service of lebensraum in the
Nineteenth Century in the United States, Argentina, and Russia

12:00 Lunch

1:00
Session 5 Science and Colonial Identities
Moderator: Warren Dym (Bucknell University)

Saul Dubow (University of Sussex)
British Imperialism, Settler Colonialism, and Scientific Thought in the
Nineteenth-Century Cape

Lina del Castillo (Iowa State University)
The Gran Colombian Cartography Project, 1821-1830

Session 6 Institutions and Imperial Science
Moderator: Daniel Headrick

Rebekah Higgitt (National Maritime Museum)
Exporting Greenwich: The Royal Observatory as a Model for Imperial
Observatories

Max Jones (University of Manchester)
Heroes of Empire? Geographical Societies, the Media, and the Promotion of
Exploration

Darwin’s Brave New World

In July of 2009, I posted about a forthcoming Australian Darwin film based on historian Iain McCalman‘s recently published book Darwin’s Armada: Four Voyages and the Battle for the Theory of Evolution:

Award-winning cultural historian Iain McCalman tells the stories of Charles Darwin and his most vocal supporters and colleagues: Joseph Hooker, Thomas Huxley, and Alfred Wallace. Beginning with the somber morning of April 26, 1882—the day of Darwin’s funeral—Darwin’s Armada steps back in time and recounts the lives and scientific discoveries of each of these explorers. The four amateur naturalists voyaged separately from Britain to the southern hemisphere in search of adventure and scientific fame. From Darwin’s inaugural trip on the Beagle in 1835 through Wallace’s exploits in the Amazon and, later, Malaysia in the 1840s and 1850s, each man independently made discoveries that led him to embrace Darwin’s groundbreaking theory of evolution. This book reveals the untold story of Darwin’s greatest supporters who, during his life, campaigned passionately in the war of ideas over evolution and who lived on to extend and advance the scope of his work.

McCalman also coedited a volume of papers, In the Wake of the Beagle: Science in the Southern Oceans from the Age of Darwin, based on a conference by the same name held at the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney in March 2009:

Strange as it may seem, the long wake of the tiny HMS Beagle stretches from the nineteenth century into the future of our globe. Charles Darwin spent only three months in Australia, but Australasia and the Pacific contributed to his evolutionary thinking in a variety of ways. One hundred and fifty years after the publication of On the Origin of Species the internationally acclaimed authors of In the Wake of the Beagle provide new insights into the world of collecting, surveying and cross-cultural exchange in the antipodes in the age of Darwin. They explore the groundbreaking work of Darwin and his contemporaries Joseph Hooker, Thomas Huxley and Alfred Wallace, examine the complex trading relationships of the region’s daring voyagers, and take a very modern look at today’s cutting-edge scientific research, at a time when global warming has raised the stakes to an unprecedented level.

The film, Darwin’s Brave New World, is described as:

A 3 x 1hour drama-documentary TV series about how the Southern Hemisphere gave birth to the most controversial idea in science: evolution by means of natural selection. Interweaving dramatic reconstruction with documentary actuality and moving between the 19th century and the 21st, this series is the story of how Charles Darwin’s ‘dangerous idea’ developed during his epic voyage through South America, Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands and how that idea forever transformed society and science. A series to coincide with the 150th anniversary of the publication of Darwin’s ‘On the Origin of Species’.

The film premieres at the University of British Columbia later this month, and airs on Australia’s ABC1 November 8th (ep. 1: Origins), 15th (ep. 2: Evolutions), and 22nd (ep. 3: Publish and Be Damned). An extended trailer:

Notice in the trailer a few historians or philosophers of science (Jim Moore, Michael Ruse, and Janet Browne), Richard Dawkins, and David Suzuki.

Cambridge Trip #5: Darwin Groupies Explore Cambridge

Sunday, 12 July 2009

Fairly close to the bed and breakfast I (and Richard) stayed at is Darwin College, named after the Darwin family (read the history here). Some pictures:

Darwin College, University of Cambridge

Darwin College, University of Cambridge

Darwin Bust, Darwin College, University of Cambridge

Darwin Bust, Darwin College, University of Cambridge

Then along King’s College and Clare College:

Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) in the River Cam, Kings College, University of Cambridge

Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) in the River Cam, King's College, University of Cambridge

Clare College and the River Cam, University of Cambridge

Clare College and the River Cam, University of Cambridge

When we came upon this next spot, we noted the big Darwin display in multiple windows:

Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

Darwin Display, Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

Darwin Display, Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

Darwin Display, Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

Darwin Display, Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

Darwin Display, Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

Darwin Display, Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

From the CUP Bookshop we made our way through a few streets to Boots the Chemist, a pharmacy. The site though is the location of Darwin’s lodgings in 1828 while an undergraduate at Christ’s College:

Site of Darwin Lodgings (1828), Boots the Chemist, Cambridge, England

Site of Darwin Lodgings (1828), Boots the Chemist, Cambridge, England

Site of Darwin Lodgings (1828), Boots the Chemist, Cambridge, England

Site of Darwin Lodgings (1828), Boots the Chemist, Cambridge, England

Michael at site of Darwin's 1828 lodgings (Photo by Richard Carter)

Michael at site of Darwin's 1828 lodgings (Photo by Richard Carter)

On elsewhere.

Mammoth, Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge

Mammoth, Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge

Iguanodon & Sloth (?), Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge

Iguanodon & Sloth (?), Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge

Darwin Window, Leverhulme Centre for Human Evolutionary Studies, University of Cambridge

Darwin Window, Leverhulme Centre for Human Evolutionary Studies, University of Cambridge

And now we were at another site of Darwin’s lodgings (post-Beagle, 1836-7), Fitzwilliam Street:

Fitzwilliam Street, Site of Darwin Lodgings (1836-37), Cambridge, England

Fitzwilliam Street, Site of Darwin Lodgings (1836-37), Cambridge, England

Fitzwilliam Street, Site of Darwin Lodgings (1836-37), Cambridge, England

Fitzwilliam Street, Site of Darwin Lodgings (1836-37), Cambridge, England

Fitzwilliam Street, Site of Darwin Lodgings (1836-37), Cambridge, England

Fitzwilliam Street, Site of Darwin Lodgings (1836-37), Cambridge, England

Nearby was The Fitzwilliam Museum, which has the art exhibit Endless Forms: Charles Darwin, Natural Science and the Visual Arts. The museum was closed (as it was on Monday too!), so we did not get to see this exhibit. Some pictures from the outside:

The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

Endless Forms, Darwin Art Exhibit at The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

Endless Forms, Darwin Art Exhibit at The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

Endless Forms, Darwin Art Exhibit at The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

Endless Forms, Darwin Art Exhibit at The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

Some miscellaneous shots:

Tour Bus, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, England

Tour Bus, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, England

Outdoor Used Booksale, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, England

Outdoor Used Booksale, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, England

Other Darwin displays:

Darwin Display, The Shop At Kings, University of Cambridge

Darwin Display, The Shop At King's, University of Cambridge

Darwin Display at Heffers Bookstore, Cambridge, England

Darwin Display at Heffers Bookstore, Cambridge, England

We decided to get something to eat, and Richard wanted to treat my to my first pint of warm British ale (in actually, my first beer). What better place to do this than the Eagle Pub:

The Eagle Pub (Photo by Richard Carter)

The Eagle Pub (Photo by Richard Carter)

Enjoying Old Speckled Hen, the Eagle Pub, Cambridge, England (Photo by Richard Carter)

Enjoying Old Speckled Hen, the Eagle Pub, Cambridge, England (Photo by Richard Carter)

After fish & chips and some beer, we decided to head back toward the bed and breakfast. Some shots along the way:

Trinity Street, University of Cambridge

Trinity Street, University of Cambridge

Whewells Court, Trinity College, University of Cambridge

Whewells Court, Trinity College, University of Cambridge

Whewell is William Whewell (1794-1866), English polymath and coiner of “scientist.” He was connected with Trinity College.

Round Church, University of Cambridge

Round Church, University of Cambridge

Jesus Lane, University of Cambridge

Jesus Lane, University of Cambridge

Our Lady and the English Martyrs Church, Cambridge, England

Our Lady and the English Martyrs Church, Cambridge, England

Our Lady and the English Martyrs Church, Cambridge, England

Our Lady and the English Martyrs Church, Cambridge, England

Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge

Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge

The Scott Polar Research Institute’s museum would have been on my list to see, but it is currently closed for renovations.

Coe Fen, Cambridge, England

Coe Fen, Cambridge, England

Plenty of walking for one evening. We needed rest for even more walking and museum-going on Monday.

You can view all the photos from my trip here, if you feel so inclined. Some of Richard’s Cambridge photos are here.

PREVIOUS: Cambridge Trip #4: Darwin in the Field Conference, Pt. 2Cambridge Trip #3: Darwin in the Field ConferenceCambridge Trip #2: Finding My WayCambridge Trip #1: Traveling

“HMS Beagle in the Galápagos” by John Chancellor. © Dr Gordon Chancellor and reproduced with his kind permission.

“HMS Beagle in the Galápagos” by John Chancellor. © Dr Gordon Chancellor and reproduced with his kind permission.

About the painting see p. 49-60 of this special issue of the Linnean, “Celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Darwin-Wallace theory of evolution” (3.7Mb PDF):

CONFERENCE: In the wake of the Beagle

From the Australian National Maritime Museum:

In the wake of the Beagle – Science in the southern oceans from the age of Darwin

Start Date: 20 March 2009

End Date: 21 March 2009

A major symposium in conjunction with the Australian National Maritime Museum’s exhibition Charles Darwin – Voyages and ideas that shook the world. Internationally acclaimed speakers provide new insights into the world of collecting, surveying and cross-cultural exchange in the antipodes in the age of Darwin and take a modern look at Darwin and his contemporaries’ influence on today’s cutting-edge scientific research.

 

“For a small ten-gun brig belonging to what sailors wryly called the ‘coffin class’, HMS Beagle has created the largest wake of any ship in history.”
Professor lain McCalman
Strange as it may seem, the long wake of HMS Beagle stretches from the nineteenth century into the future of our globe. Charles Darwin spent only three months in Australia, but Australasia and the Pacific contributed to his evolutionary thinking in a variety of ways. One hundred and fifty years after the publication of On the Origin of Species and on the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin’s birth, the museum is proud to present In the Wake of the Beagle – a celebratory symposium of internationally acclaimed speakers providing new insights into the world of collecting, surveying and cross-cultural exchange in the antipodes in the age of Darwin.

They explore the groundbreaking work of Darwin and his contemporaries Joseph Hooker, Thomas Huxley and Alfred Wallace, shed light on their interaction with the region’s indigenous voyagers, and take a very modern look at the naturalists’ influence on today’s cutting-edge scientific research, at a time when global warming has raised

This conference has been made possible thanks to the support of an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant, Seeing Change: Science, Culture and Technology in the Antipodes from the age of Darwin.

Speakers

Dr Chris Ballard, Fellow Division of Pacific & Asian History, Australian National University;

Mike Bluett Producer, Becker Group;

Dr Lissant Bolton, Senior Curator Oceania, British Museum;

Dr John Collee, novelist and screenwriter;

Dr Jim Endersby, Sussex University;

Dr Nigel Erskine, Curator, Australian National Maritime Museum;

Mr Julian Holland, researcher and former curator;

Dugald Jellie, travel writer, The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald;

Sophie Jensen, Senior Curator, National Museum of Australia;

Prof. lain McCalman, University of Sydney;

Richard Neville, Mitchell Librarian, State Library of NSW;

Prof. Frank Nicholas, Animal Genetics, University of Sydney;

Dr Jude Philp, Senior Curator, Macleay Museum;

Paul White, Dept. of History & Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge;

Dr Kate Wilson, Director, Wealth from Oceans National Research Flagship, CSlRO

2-Day registration $50, ANMM Members or students $30
1-day registration $25, ANMM Members or students $15

Download the registration form In the wake of the Beagle – Science in the southern oceans from the age of Darwin Symposium%20registration%20form%20to%20download (609 kb)

For further information contact the members office on (02) 9298 3644 members@anmm.gov.au