HMS Beagle to set sail for LEGO – only with your help!

Luis Peña has designed a LEGO set for HMS Beagle, complete with Charles Darwin and Captain Fitzroy minifigs, among others. He posted it to the LEGO Ideas website, in which set suggestions receive support and if they reach 10,000 supporters within a year of being posted, LEGO will consider making the set a reality.

I supported this set, and hope you will too. It’s necessary to create an account on the site in order to cast your support, but it’s quick and easy, and worth it, don’t you think?

Here are some images from Luis:

Darwin gift from my mom

Today I received this in the mail from my mother, which she found in an antique shop. Despite the water damage, it’s in readable condition.

Darwin as a Naturalist

Carroll Lane Fenton, Darwin as a Naturalist [Little Blue Book No. 567] (Girard, KA: Haldeman-Julius Company, 1924), 64 pages.

Fenton also authored other Little Blue Books about animals, biology, evolution, geology, life of the past, and Ersnt Haeckel. This pdf gives a list of the entire series.

Thanks, Mom!

New USPS American Scientist stamps feature Darwin supporter and botanist Asa Gray

Forever Stamps Honoring Four Distinguished Scientists

The United States Postal Service has released another stamp collection in their American Scientist series. Included here are chemist Melvin Calvin; botanist Asa Gray; physicist Maria Goeppert Mayer; and biochemist Severo Ochoa.

Asa Gray? Hell yes!

Asa Gray, one of the first professional botanists in the United States, advanced the specialized field of plant geography and became the principal American advocate of evolutionary theory in the mid-nineteenth century.

I went to my nearest post office on Tuesday morning and purchased 3 sheets: one for myself, one to send to Richard Carter, FCD, and another to send to playwright Craig Baxter, who penned the fabulous Darwin/Gray drama, Re:Design.

New USPS American Scientist stamps featured Darwin supporter and botanist Asa Gray

Has the USPS ever released a stamp in any way connected to evolution or Darwin?

Another eBay item

UPDATE (3/23/11): George Beccaloni found online an image of this card with names included (and I like how what looks like a monkey at the top right is closest to Darwin):

———-

This Victorian cabinet card was offered recently on eBay. The seller knew that Charles Darwin was one of the figures, but who are the others?

Top row: ???, ???, Charles Darwin
Bottom row: ???, Herbert Spencer, ???

“Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp”

charlesdarwin-stampg

For any Darwin stamp collectors out there:

The May-June issue of Topical Time, a philatelic (stamp) magazine, has a great article by Barry N. Floyd titled, “Charles Darwin: the great naturalist.”  There have been (apparently) 140 stamps honoring Darwin, his work, or his travels, and for those you who are stamp-collecting evolution fans, the American Topical Association has produced a checklist for you (you have to join first…then they’ll send you the list). I don’t have access to the checklist, but I can’t seem to find any Darwin stamps released by the United States.  (I know, I know — you are shocked.)  One might argue that the United States wouldn’t bother to issue a stamp honoring somebody who never even came to the country…but that didn’t stop  North Korea (see stamp block below), Democratic Republic of Congo, and many others.

Anyone a member of ATA and have access to the article and checklist?

Also, see here.

Some other Darwin stamps & a coin

Two thoughts:

1. It’s nice to see a younger Darwin on the stamps.

2. It’s a shame that the USPS didn’t produce a Darwin stamp!

Stamps from the Falkland Islands (more info here):

Falkland Islands (click to see larger)

Stamps from Ascension Island (more info here):

Darwin  - Mint Set

Ascension Island (click to see larger)

Coin from the Falkland Islands (more info here):

Falkland Islands

Cambridge Trip #8: Darwin’s Microscope at the Whipple Museum of the History of Science

Monday, 13 July 2009

Following a visit to the University Museum of Zoology in Cambridge, Richard and I headed over to the Whipple Museum of the History of Science to see the exhibit featuring Darwin’s microscope. On the way there, we checked out the Cambridge University Press Bookshop and spotted some interesting history of science spots:

Cambridge, England

Cambridge, England

Mobile Library, Cambridge, England

Mobile Library, Cambridge, England

At the bookshop, Richard went crazy and spent a deal on some Darwin books, including the not-so-cheap Charles Darwin’s Notebooks from the Voyage of the Beagle, edited by Gordon Chancellor and John van Wyhe. I bought one book, Charles Darwin: The Beagle Letters.

Darwin Display, Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

Darwin Display, Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

Darwin Display, Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

Darwin Display, Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

History of Science, Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

History of Science, Cambridge University Press Bookshop, Cambridge, England

Ladybird Beetle, Cambridge, England

Ladybird Beetle, Cambridge, England

Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, England

Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, England

Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, England

Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, England

Plaque for J.J. Thompson, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, England

Plaque for J.J. Thompson, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, England

Crooked Doorway, Cambridge, England

Crooked Doorway, Cambridge, England

The Whipple Museum, which is in the same building that houses the Department of History and Philosophy of Science:

The Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

The Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge

Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge

The exhibit Darwin’s Microscope (much more than a microscope was on display):

Darwins Microscope, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin's Microscope, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwins Microscope, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin's Microscope, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwins achromatic compound microscope, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin's achromatic compound microscope, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwins achromatic compound microscope, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin's achromatic compound microscope (1847) for his barnacle research, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Microscope slide storage, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Microscope slide storage, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Letter from Darwin to J.D. Hooker about the microscope, Whipple Museum of the History of Science, University of Cambridge

Letter from Darwin to J.D. Hooker about the microscope, Whipple Museum of the History of Science, University of Cambridge

Vol. II of Darwins A monograph on the sub-class Cirripedia (barnacles), Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Vol. II of Darwin's 'A monograph on the sub-class Cirripedia' (barnacles), Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

In the same display case as the compound microscope were a bunch of evolutionary books and an older compound microscope similar to one Darwin had at Cambridge in the 1830s:

Older compound microscope, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Older compound microscope, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Evolutionary books, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Evolutionary books, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Evolutionary books, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Evolutionary books, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Part of this exhibit showcased The Darwin Correspondence Project, based at Cambridge (they have just published the 17th volume):

Darwin Correspondence Project display, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin Correspondence Project display, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin Correspondence Project display, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin Correspondence Project display, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin Correspondence Project display, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin Correspondence Project display, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin Correspondence Project display, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin Correspondence Project display, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

This image is not from the correspondence project, but from Richard, who, the day before leaving for Cambridge, ordered the new volume from his local bookshop, not realizing that he would be visiting the Cambridge University Press’s bookshop. Oh well.

Richards Darwin Correspondence Collection

Richard's Darwin Correspondence Collection

One display in the exhibit showcased in drawers a wide variety of Darwin memorabilia:

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

The caricature print in the image above I discussed in a post on my other blog, Transcribing Tyndall.

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin memorabilia, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Another display showed late nineteenth-century responses to Darwin:

Responses to Darwin, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Responses to Darwin, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

The caricature print above was also featured in the same post on Transcribing Tyndall.

Responses to Darwin, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Responses to Darwin, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Responses to Darwin, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Responses to Darwin, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Various posters and wall hangings:

Darwin wall hangings, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin wall hangings, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin wall hangings, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin wall hangings, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin wall hangings, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin wall hangings, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin wall hangings, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Darwin wall hangings, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Some shots from the rest of the museum:

Anatomical model of a fetus, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Anatomical model of a fetus, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Natural history displays, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Natural history displays, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Whipple Museum of the History of Science, University of Cambridge

Whipple Museum of the History of Science, University of Cambridge

Telescope, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Telescope, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Newton wants your money, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

Newton wants your money, Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

R.S. Whipple, Founder of the Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

R.S. Whipple, Founder of the Whipple Museum, University of Cambridge

After the Whipple Museum, we weren’t sure what to do next. Around the corner from the museum we ran into John van Wyhe, one of the Darwin historians I met at the conference (and owner of a Darwin groupie bike), as he was headed to his office at the building where the Whipple Museum is:

John van Wyhe, University of Cambridge

John van Wyhe, University of Cambridge. Photo by Richard Carter

Although it was Monday and Darwin’s room at Christ’s College was not open to the public, he quickly treated Richard and I to a look (other pictures from Christ’s I posted here). John was, after all, in charge of the restoration. Richard was also delighted to get his Beagle notebook signed by one of its editors. I will share photos from Darwin’s room in the next post.

You can view all the photos from my trip here, if you feel so inclined. Some of Richard’s Cambridge photos are here.

PREVIOUS: Cambridge Trip #7: Beetles, Finches and Barnacles at the University Museum of ZoologyCambridge Trip #6: Darwin the Geologist at the Sedgwick Museum of Earth SciencesCambridge Trip #5: Darwin Groupies Explore CambridgeCambridge Trip #4: Darwin in the Field Conference, Pt. 2Cambridge Trip #3: Darwin in the Field ConferenceCambridge Trip #2: Finding My WayCambridge Trip #1: Traveling

Thank You

to Richard Carter of The Friends of Charles Darwin for sending me The Royal Mint’s £2 Darwin coin:

The Royal Mints £2 Darwin coin

The Royal Mint's £2 Darwin coin

And to Laura Massey of the book history blog Bookn3rd for obtaining for me the Tree of Life poster (free, but only orderable if you are in the UK), produced by The Open University with Darwin 200 and the BBC:

Tree of Life poster from The Open University

Tree of Life poster from The Open University

Tree of Life poster from The Open University

Tree of Life poster from The Open University

There was a little something extra on the package Laura sent the poster in:

From Monkey to Mailman

From Monkey to Mailman

Yes, the March of Progress results in a mailman (and women)!

2009 Stamps in Honor of Darwin

The Darwin bicentennial brings new Darwin stamps from several countries.

UK:

uk-2

uk-3

The UK stamps can also be had as a Beagle Project first day cover. Richard Carter, FCD is truly a friend, for he sent me the UK stamps. See Royal Mail, here, and here.

ITALY:

italy1

See here.

PORTUGAL:

portugal-1

portugal-2

portugal-3

See herehere, and here.

BULGARIA:

bulgaria-1

bulgaria-2

See here.

CZECH REPUBLIC:

czech-republic

See here.

The blog Rainbow Stamp Club has posted much on Darwin stamps, including past stamps… And thanks to George Beccaloni for information as well.

Please let me know if you know of any other 2009 Darwin stamps, and I’ll add them here.

Darwin Postcard circa 1970: Why was Darwin so famous?

I got this little Darwin collectible via eBay. A postcard of the Darwin statue in Shrewsbury, Darwin’s birthplace, erected in 1897. Many photos of the statue online, and Darwin postcards (& many other Darwin collectibles) displayed at Darwiniana (I just discovered this website). The back of the postcard has a message to Jane & Richard Webster from Jean:

Just arrived at our Guild Holiday Home. We’ve had good weather so far – only rain on Tuesday evening & during last night. We had a good look at Darwin’s statue on Thursday- Do you know why he is so famous? If not – ask your Dad!

Glad to see someone’s father knew about Darwin – but what did he know? We’ll never know. Why do you think Darwin was so famous?

Darwin in the Mail

I was delighted to receive a package in the mail yesterday from Richard Carter, who runs the Friends of Charles Darwin and its blog, The Red Notebook. Included in the package were a few Darwin Day postcards, and 3 Darwin Day/Darwin fish stickers from evolvefish.com. Most exciting for a Darwin fan, however, was a nice, crisp, beautiful 10 pound note with Darwin on it. Thank you, Richard, and everyone read his blog!