ARTICLE: Darwin’s Other Bulldog: Charles Kingsley and the Popularisation of Evolution in Victorian England

In the journal Science & Education:

Darwin’s Other Bulldog: Charles Kingsley and the Popularisation of Evolution in Victorian England

 

Piers J. Hale

 

Abstract The nineteenth-century Anglican Priest Charles Kingsley (1819–1875) was a significant populariser of Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection. Kingsley was successful in this regard because he developed such diverse connections throughout his career. In the 1840s he associated with Chartists and radical journalists; in the 1850s and 1860s he moved freely in scientific circles and was elected Fellow of the Linnean Society of London in 1856 and Fellow of the Geological Society of London in 1863. In 1859 he was appointed Chaplain in Ordinary to the Queen. In 1860 the Prince Consort was willing and able to secure Kingsley appointment as the Regius Professor of Modern History at Cambridge University and he subsequently became tutor to the Prince of Wales. Thereafter he was frequently invited into high Victorian Society. A friend of ‘Darwin’s Bulldog’ Thomas Huxley, of the eminent geologist Charles Lyell and a correspondent of Darwin, at every turn he sought to promote Darwin’s ideas as theologically orthodox, a life-long campaign in which he was eminently successful.

One thought on “ARTICLE: Darwin’s Other Bulldog: Charles Kingsley and the Popularisation of Evolution in Victorian England

  1. Pingback: Uncommon Descent | Here’s another of Darwin’s original bulldogs – the theistic Darwinist Charles Kingsley

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